Red Sea Road

We buried dreamsredsea-roadjpg
Laid them deep into the earth behind us
Said our goodbyes
At the grave but everything reminds us . . .
God knows, we ache
When He asks us to go on
How do we go on?

We will sing, to our souls
We won’t bury our hope
Where He leads us to go
There’s a red sea road

When we can’t see the way
He will part the waves
And we’ll never walk alone
Down a red sea road . . . .

How can we trust
When You say You will deliver us from
All of this pain that threatens to take over us
Well, this desert’s dry
But the ocean may consume
And we’re scared, to follow You

So we’ll sing, to our souls
We won’t bury our hope
Where He leads us to go
There’s a red sea road

When we can’t see the way
He will part the waves
And we’ll never walk alone
Down a red sea road . . . .

Bridge
Oh help us believe
You are faithful, You’re faithful
When our hearts are breaking
You are faithful, You’re faithful
Oh grant us eyes to see
You are faithful, You’re faithful
Teach us to sing
You are faithful, You’re faithful, You’re faithful

And we’ll sing, to our souls
    We won’t bury our hope
Where He leads us to go
    There’s a red sea road

When we can’t see the way
    He will part the waves
And we’ll never walk alone
    Down a red sea road . . . .

No, we’ll never walk alone
    Down a red sea road
No, we’ll never, walk alone
    Down a red sea road ….

Ellie Holcomb, “Red Sea Road,” Red Sea Road (2017).

AEB 1931-2016

Alban Emerson Brooke
July 1, 1931 — November 4, 2016

Alban Emerson Brooke, 85, of Jacksonville, FL, passed away suddenly on November 4, 2016 from a head injury suffered after an accidental fall.

He was best known to the public as an attorney and judge in Duval, Clay and Nassau County from 1960 to 2002. Born in Louisville, KY, he was raised in Sandy Spring, Maryland. He attended The Citadel (The Military College of South Carolina), graduating in 1953 and served in the United States Air Force during the Korean War. After his discharge, he attended the George Washington University Law School. Upon relocating to Jacksonville in the late 1950s, he became the 9,027th member of The Florida Bar, and was in private practice until 1980. He then served in the Fourth Judicial Circuit State Attorney’s Office under T. Edward Austin from May 19, 1980 to December 31, 1988, before he was appointed as a trial judge in Florida’s Fourth Judicial Circuit in 1988, serving for 13 years, until his retirement at the end of 2002.

He is survived by his wife of more than 61 years, Mary Grace Brooke; his children — local attorney Allan F. Brooke II (Katherine), Grace Brooke Huffman, M.D. (Steve) of Winchester, Virginia, and Peter Emerson Brooke; his grandchildren — Alban Emerson Brooke II (Marie), Philip Davis Brooke, Ph.D. (Cecilia), Priscilla Mary Brooke, Sarah Katherine Brooke, Thomas Tarlton Brooke, and Thomas Brooke Huffman; and his great-granddaughter Emerson Rose Brooke. He was blessed to have most of his family living close by.

He had been a member of the Session of Riverside Presbyterian Church and was later a deacon at First Baptist Church. He was a man of deep personal integrity, broad intellectual interests and was known for his compassion and concern. He had a great sense of humor and a nearly endless supply of stories. He read widely, enjoyed contract bridge, and was devoted to his Lord.

His devotion was characterized by his service as husband and father, as he and Mary Grace dedicated their retirement years to the care of their youngest son, Peter. He will be much missed by his family, friends and community, as he adds his voice to the chorus of praise around the throne of God.

Soli Deo Gloria.

A Memorial Service and reception will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 at Westside Chapel, 4541 Shirley Ave., Ste 8, Jacksonville, FL 32210.

In lieu of flowers, donations to The Arc Jacksonville (www.arcjacksonville.org) or Westside Chapel (www.westsidechapeljax.com) would be appreciated.

Arrangements by Naugle Funeral Home & Cremation Services, 1203 Hendricks Avenue, Jacksonville, FL (904) 396-1611.

“That’s one of the hazards here.”

From Marvin Olasky’s interview of Hadley Arkes:

hadley-arkes-facebook1[Olasky] What’s the major way students have changed in 50 years?  [Arkes] One notable change: They have trouble doing sit-down exams and giving an account of what they’ve read. They have not been required to read closely. How does the writer’s argument move? What are the supporting points of evidence? How does he reach the culmination? They can’t do that, except the very best.

Would both major presidential candidates get an F on one of your exams? I don’t think I could get from Donald Trump a precise account of anything he reads. Hillary Clinton would give me the party line: Whatever the subject, we need gun control.

You say we have a choice between “the brutal sure thing,” Hillary Clinton, and “the wild card,” Donald Trump. Hillary Clinton is not a question mark. For her and the left, the “right to abortion” is the first freedom, displacing freedom of religion and freedom of speech anchoring axioms.

You’re for the wild card, particularly because of Supreme Court appointments? I am, but it’s not merely about replacing justices. With Clinton, the lower federal courts that handle most of the cases—the points of first entry—will be filled with characters from the academic left who favor theories that ordinary folk take as bizarre.

*    *    *

Does [Trump] care about judges? I don’t think he cares overly much about the courts and the Supreme Court. He certainly hasn’t troubled to read much about them. He depends on other people. That’s one of the hazards here.

“Hadley Arkes: Life and politics” World (August 18, 2016) [link] (emphasis added).

I’m still not convinced — sounds more pragmatic than principled — but I have a good deal of respect for Professor Arkes (who has taught Political Philosophy at Amherst for 50 years).

Passion Week

I could never myself believe in God, if it were not for the cross.The only God I believe in is the One Nietzsche ridiculed as ‘God on the cross.’

In the real world of pain, how could one worship a God who was immune to it? I have entered many Buddhist temples in different Asian countries and stood respectfully before the statue of the Buddha, his legs crossed, arms folded, eyes closed, the ghost of a smile playing round his mouth, a remote look on his face, detached from the agonies of the world.  But each time after a while I have had to turn away.

9780857215932And in imagination I have turned instead to that lonely, twisted, tortured figure on the cross, nails through hands and feet, back lacerated, limbs wrenched, brow bleeding from thorn-pricks, mouth dry and intolerably thirsty, plunged in Godforsaken darkness. That is the God for me! He laid aside his immunity to pain. He entered our world of flesh and blood, tears and death. He suffered for us. Our sufferings become more manageable in the light of his.

John Stott, Through the Bible through the Year 269.

To be clear . . .

ScreenShot142I did not realize that “No, I don’t” would strike a nerve like that. I may have had more political conversations in the last four days than in the prior four months.

The people who disagreed said two things that bear response, because they are right:

1. “You can’t restrict yourself to voting only for people with whom you agree 100%.” This is absolutely true. Most of the votes I have cast in my life have been for people I agreed with only in part. But isn’t there a limit to this? I have come to think that there is and that some candidates do not meet the minimum.*

2. “The next President is going two be able to appoint two Supreme Court justices, and that is going to affect the country for the next 25 years, not just the next four.” This is, if anything, too weak. President Obama is going to nominate Justice Scalia’s replacement, and the next President may well nominate replacements for the three remaining Justices who are over 75 years old. That is a huge turnover in the Court, and it is very important. Before 2020, the Court may well consist of Justices Roberts, Thomas, Alito, Sotomayer, Kagan and four people we have not heard of. Nevertheless, I think we are going to have to trust God, not the candidate, for these selections.**

In the end, that is my real point.

The Republican Party has entirely lost control of its process and the Democratic Party seems never to have guessed that a 74-year old Senator might not make a 68-year old former First Lady, Senator, and Secretary of State look energetic and youthful.

But God has not lost control of anything at all.

 

*Should I say “my minimum” to be completely clear? I am not telling anyone “You cannot vote for Donald Trump,” or “You cannot vote for Hillary Clinton.” Maybe they sufficiently reflect your values and your sense of right and wrong. I am saying “I cannot vote for either, and there is no spiritual duty to vote pragmatically.”

**Of course, many Presidents have found that it is hard to guess how their Supreme Court appointments will turn out. Eisenhower was supposed to have said that his two biggest mistakes were sitting on the Supreme Court — Earl Warren and William Brennan.  These things are not entirely within human control.

No, I don’t.

ScreenShot141How many times have we all heard that it is our civic responsibility to vote, that if we are unhappy with our choices we have to make a pragmatic choice and pick the lesser of two evils?

I reject that position.

First, because you and I have a responsibility to do good and to worship God. There are real ethical dilemmas, but we must do good, not evil.

Second, because we don’t have only two choices, we have at least five. Assuming that things go as the polls suggest, we will all have a choice between the Democratic candidate, the Republican candidate, a variety of third-party candidates, a write-in candidate, or not voting. No matter which candidates the parties offer us, one of the latter two options would be permissible. (Of course, I am well aware that not voting is not practical. I do not put much stock in practicality when it is weighed against morality.)

Third, because the GOP, at least, needs to understand that this is unacceptable. Mr. Trump reflects rage and dissatisfaction, not statesmanship and leadership. (Ms. Clinton, to be fair, reflects the mainstream of the Democratic Party leadership, whether or not she reflects the core of the general population.)

Fourth, because I believe that there is power in prayer, and that God’s plans don’t develop along election cycles. Maybe this is exactly what’s necessary to bring both parties back to sanity and civility. Maybe this is what’s necessary to get believers to pray for those in power.*

Finally, there is still something that can be done — perhaps you can still vote in a primary against a candidate by voting for an acceptable candidate who is in second place. Perhaps you can write your political party and explain why they have lost your vote or registration. To be clear, if the Republican Party nominates Mr. Trump, I will change my registration to Independent. It is becoming increasingly difficult to accept that in any sense the GOP is representing me.

I have to vote?

No, I don’t.

I need to pray.


*1 Timothy 2:1-4 (ESV): “First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, or kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior. who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.”

For whom do you work?

Today, a wise person said to me, “I work for the Lord. He doesn’t have to pay me because he has already paid.”

Reminds me of Colossians 3:23-24 (ESV): “Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the inheritance as your reward. You are serving the Lord Christ.”

I probably need lots of reminders!