Fallacy?

An insightful look at why we don’t do things we think we should — the author wants us to think beyond “I don’t feel like it.”  I think she is right, though it may not always be easy to do what she suggests.

Darya Rose, “The ‘I Don’t Feel Like It’ Fallacy,” Medium (Mar. 1, 2016) [link]

Two thoughts:

  1. This has application far beyond food/diet/health.
  2. Paul has further thoughts about the disconnect between “what I do” and “what I want to do” which are also relevant to this problem. Romans 7.

Breaking the Siege

Slide1A Pattern of Prayer, part 3: A Pattern of Desperation
February 28, 2016 | 2 Kings 19-20
(Hezekiah’s prayers)

Before the period of modern warfare, it was common for cities to be fortified and for attackers to camp outside the walls, laying siege to the city, hoping that starvation and plague would defeat the defenders. When surrounded by a competent army, it was difficult for a city to break the siege without outside help.

Air access now make sieges less likely, but occasionally they have been used in modern wars.

You will recall that in August 1939, Hitler and Stalin entered into a non-aggression pact which divided Poland and a number of other countries between Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. This pact cleared the way for Germany to invade Poland and begin World War II. The Germans and Soviets refrained from fighting each other for nearly two years. Continue reading Breaking the Siege

Sleep much?

Do you have trouble going to sleep (or staying asleep)?  I have friends who wake up in the night to take melatonin (which seems counterproductive, though I don’t want to be discouraging).  My method is to make sure that the temperature in the house starts with a “6” in fahrenheit (“5” would work better, but my family would protest from under their mounds of elk skins).

In any case, The New Yorker (“Annals of Insomnia”) has an amusing article for anyone who has (or fears) sleep issues:

Patricia Marx, “In Search of Forty Winks: Gizmos for a good night’s sleep” The New Yorker (Feb. 8 & 15, 2016) [link]

Read it tonight — not on your computer, silly, avoid that blue light!  Print it out and leave it on your bedside table.